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News: “Flying is like good music: it elevates the spirit and it's an exhilarating freedom. It's not a thrill thing or an adrenaline rush; it's engaging in a process that takes focus and commitment." - Harrison Ford

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Actually KVUO is the closest by road to downtown Portland.  Uber would be your best bet from there; rental car is only available if Enterprise will pick you up and take you to their office a couple of miles away.  There are nice hotels close to KVUO — Homewood Suites, right by the river, and Vancouver Hilton.

But KPDX has the advantage of having the light rail that takes you right to the door of the Moda Center.  It’s about a 45 minute trip.  Can’t speak to the current FBO prices at KPDX, though.

There’s a light rail station about a 1/2 mile walk from KHIO, and that will take you right to Moda Center.  But that’s a longer ride, more like an hour each way.
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I am flying to Portland to see the Trailblazers play in March, and staying the night.  It's my son's birthday, and he wants to see LeBron play.

Portland area pilots, which airport is my best bet?

KPDX - probably the closest, with train.  (Is the FBO going to be expensive?)
KVUO - Isn't too bad, but I'll need to get transportation (Uber/Taxi).
KTTD - Probably the furthest?

Thanks,
-J
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IFR Workshop on Saturday, January 27 at 10am at Rainier Flight Service.  Join fellow pilots in an open forum dedicated to IFR flying.  Ask questions and share your experiences in a relaxed, social setting.  This monthly 2-hour forum is FREE and moderated by a Rainier Flight Instructor to ensure accurate information and interpretation of regulations, policies and safety. 

The topic this month is Holding:  Chances are you have never had to hold on an IFR flight.  But how can you maintain situational awareness and anticipate holding?  What can you do to prevent holding at all?  If you must hold, what resources are available to reduce workload and plan for contingencies?  Bring your experience and stories to share during this open forum discussion moderated by a professional flight instructor.

RFS Safety Seminar:
As Rainier Flight continues to grow so does the challenge of maintaining a safe operation. To ensure everyone is familiar with the latest changes in the operation we are implementing free Safety Seminars.  These short seminars will be held every other month and cover a quick review of:
-Review of Safety Reports and operational changes to mitigate future occurrences.
-Updates to our Flight Operations Manual.
-Changes to ramp operations and fueling procedures.
Attending one of our free safety seminars within the previous 6 months of flight is required to dispatch an aircraft. If you are unable to attend a seminar, you may also review any changes 1-on-1 with a Rainier instructor (instructor rates will apply). Our goal is to ensure you can enjoy a hassle-free and safe experience at Rainier.

For questions, please contact Jim at (425) 728-8922 or jim@rainierflight.com

Located at Rainier Flight Service at Renton Airport
800 W Perimeter Road
Renton, WA  98057

http://www.rainierflightservice.com/
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WPA - The Washington Pilots Association / Re: WPA Wenatchee Chapter
« Last post by Klaus on January 17, 2018, 10:21:26 PM »
  Thanks to everyone who showed up yesterday evening. We had good aviation conversation, tasty $5 cheeseburgers and maybe a cold northwest ale or two, what more can anyone ask for?  ;D

  This meeting was about laying the 2018 ground work. The Wenatchee chapter is offering the Miss Veedol group any assistance possible to promote the legend of Clyde Pangborn and the Iconic Bellance Miss Veedol. The 1931 Bellanca replica has a busy schedule flying and displaying throughout the northwest spreading the story that put Washington State in the headlines and the history books. Miss Veedol legendary flight took place during a hard time in America history when people needed heroic uplifting news.

  Good group of pilots showed up with a lot of interesting stories. Many of us get a little starved of aviation conversation so these gathering help feed that appetite. The stories are positive and encouraging. Most of us left the meeting thinking that 2018 will open a few more wallets and help the aviation industry move in to a new era.

  Like the ol' sayin' goes "No Bucks, No Buck Rogers". This year many more potential pilots are going to see a little kick in the ol' pay check. It's a good time to steer these fine folks in the right direction. The Wenatchee WPA chapter has a very diverse pilot group experienced in many categories of commercial flying. Fire fighting, Medevac, Air-taxi, Corporate, Instruction and many other very desirable aviation revenue opportunities. We're ready to show future pilots why flying is a great career and life choice.

  For those that didn't make it to this third Tuesday, we'll see you February 20th. The location will be announced here and the E-Mail. If you want on the E-Mail list contact me by this forum P.M. or the contact info here:

http://www.wpaflys.org/Chapters/Wenatchee/Wenatchee1.html
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WPA - The Washington Pilots Association / WPA Wenatchee Chapter
« Last post by Klaus on January 16, 2018, 02:07:51 PM »
    The Wenatchee Chapter of the WPA is having it's first meeting of 2018 this evening at 6 PM. Please come join us at The Rock Island Bar & Grill in Rock Island, WA. About 3 miles east of Pangborn Memorial airport (KEAT) Wenatchee.

  For those that can't make it this evening, the Wenatchee Chapter meets each "Third Tuesday" of the month. The location will be moved around each month to encourage local friendly commerce. To have your contact added to the e-mail list PM, text, call or e-mail me. My contact information is here:
http://www.wpaflys.org/Chapters/Wenatchee/Wenatchee1.html
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Flying Techniques & Skills / Re: Rounding out the pattern
« Last post by aftCG on January 16, 2018, 10:48:47 AM »
Fly something with a round engine and a big schnoz and you'll understand the appeal of a 180 degree turn to the numbers. 

In flying the BT-13 I round the corners way out and may or may not come wings level at the key position depending on how things are working out.

The pilots of Corsairs could not have seen the back of the boat without using the technique.

Quote
This reminds me of a procedure I use at KBFI on occasion to save time.  If landing on the long runway and approaching perpendicular to mid-field (ie. a vashon arrival landing north), I'll ask for a "mid-field base to a long landing".
I used to do that same chop and drop turn around tower myself.  Quite fun.  I got it at BFI by requesting a "short approach, long landing" and can be a big time saver for both parties.
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Chit-chat / Re: Boeing’s Prototype Drone
« Last post by SteveG on January 16, 2018, 09:53:23 AM »
I dont have much if any interest in going with an electric airplane, or for that matter an electric car.
A friend of mine has a Leaf, uses it for her 60-ish mile roundtrip commute to work.
Dunno if shes ever actually ran it out of juice, but shes definitely had a couple of close calls.
No thanks.

You can also run out of gas. The battery technology has been improving substantially year by year, with many e-cars capable of 300 miles range.

I would fly an electric plane. I've had a Leaf for 5 years. Costs $20/month in electricity to drive it. It's quiet, efficient, and quick! It can be full of people, and it will climb a steep hill like crazy. I ran out of juice exactly once in the five years. I use AAA, so I simply had them tow me to the Fred Meyer where I can charge the car for 20 minutes to 80%.
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Chit-chat / Re: Boeing’s Prototype Drone
« Last post by hotrod180 on January 16, 2018, 09:31:23 AM »
I dont have much if any interest in going with an electric airplane, or for that matter an electric car.
A friend of mine has a Leaf, uses it for her 60-ish mile roundtrip commute to work.
Dunno if shes ever actually ran it out of juice, but shes definitely had a couple of close calls.
No thanks.
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Chit-chat / Re: Boeing’s Prototype Drone
« Last post by Flying Dan on January 16, 2018, 09:19:07 AM »
It seems like the battery tech needs to improve a lot more.  Motor tech seems to be there, but whieght and capacity of batteries isn't.

What's that stat from 190...3?  97% of cars on the road were electric?  New York and Chicago Taxi's would hot swap battery packs to keep them going.

Batteries, it's always been the bottleneck.
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Flying Techniques & Skills / Re: Rounding out the pattern
« Last post by ErikU on January 15, 2018, 11:14:15 PM »
I really like the idea of a 180 degree turn to final for all the reasons stated.  The only thing going against it is checking for traffic on final,.. and that's a big one.  I don't really think a quick roll to wings level will work because at that point you have given up the advantages of the continuous turn.  Especially for those of us that are fast and in fairly close to begin with....  my roll level is just long enough for a quick check as it is.  I'm sure that I would be better aligned and at a reduced risk of stall in a continuous turn.

With that said, it still may be safer to do the continuous turn to final.  I think that if you turn to final inside of conflicting traffic, the conflicting traffic is much more likely to see you than you are to see them if rolling level for a traffic check.  I think this is well worth further study.

This reminds me of a procedure I use at KBFI on occasion to save time.  If landing on the long runway and approaching perpendicular to mid-field (ie. a vashon arrival landing north), I'll ask for a "mid-field base to a long landing".  The technique involves a perpendicular approach mid-field pointed just south of the control tower.  Drop the gear and flaps all the way, chop the power.  Make a continuous 90 degree left turn and steep descent, while watching air speed very carefully.  You end up on this steep descending turn around the control tower.  Just as you are aligning with the runway you should be about 50 feet agl.  It looks sketchy, sounds sketchy, but I think quite safe because of the continuous turn which make it all much easier to judge.  About 10-20 feet above the runway I add just enough power to remain level and fly just above for almost a mile until I see the 1000ft remaining marker.  Then I chop power, land, and roll out right at the end by my hangar.  My primary instructor taught me that when I was just a student, and I'm glad he did.  Oh, it's way fun too.

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